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Liz Warren’s great grandfather slaughtered Seminoles for US Military

If you thought lying about your heritage was bad…wait until you get a load of this.

As if the saga of Liz Warren’s alleged Native American heritage couldn’t get any more convoluted, investigators have now discovered the unsettling truth about one of the 2020 candidate’s ancestors.

Warren has come under scrutiny time and again for her previous claims of Cherokee heritage, even garnering the nickname “Fauxcahontas” in the right wing media.  President Trump himself was an outspoken critic of Warren’s claims, goading the Senator into taking a DNA test to prove her lineage.

The test didn’t go so well for Liz Warren, and she was soon on an apology tour speaking to First Nations people around the country.

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But that’s not where this story ends…not by a long shot.

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-MA) great-great-great grandfather Jonathan Crawford served in Major William Lauderdale’s Battalion of Tennessee Volunteer Militia from November 1837 to May 1838, a six month time period during which it fought two battles in Florida against the Seminoles.

Today, there are two federally recognized Native American Seminole tribes, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, which has 4,000 enrolled members, and the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, which has more than 18,000 enrolled members.

Lauderdale’s battalion fought against the Seminoles at the Battle of Loxahatchee River, in present-day Jupiter, Florida, on January 24, 1838. Then on March 22, 1838, they fought against the Seminoles again at the Battle of Pine Island, in present-day Fort Lauderdale.

Evidence supporting Jonathan Crawford’s service under Lauderdale in Florida was brought by his widow, Neoma O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford, also known as Neona Crawford, to the Bledsoe County Commission of Bledsoe County, Tennessee in 1850 and 1851, when she applied for a pension from the U.S. government for her husband’s service during the 1837-1838 Second Seminole War.

One wonders whether or not ABC moderators will have the courage to inquire about this new revelation during Thursday night’s democratic debate, in which Warren and former VP Joe Biden are expected to go head-to-head.

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